Some contractors work on time and material others on a firm contract. I would never hire the former and am leary of the latter. A contractor may low-ball a bid to get the job planning to make a killing on change orders. If you say good morning to them, they charge you extra for that. If the contract is not very, very specific and extensively fleshed out or if they display their change order schedule prominently on top, show them the door.
This company painted my house about one year ago. We have paint peeling off the exterior of the house now. We have left many messages for him to come out and fix the problem, he gave us a warranty incase this type of thing happened. We bought the best paint and primer the problem was in the prep work, that's why its peeling off of the house. Basically 3500 bucks down the tube be aware his warranty is worthless...
Specify whether the contractor or you will supply the paint. Check Consumer Reports' paint ratings: In its tests, some relatively inexpensive paints performed better than more expensive paints and cost $10 to $20 less per gallon. But keep in mind that most paints will resist cracking, peeling, mold and mildew. Who does the painting — and how well they do it — is more important than what's in the bucket.
I would never suggest that one of my clients buy their own paint because A . They will pay an average of $20 to $30 more per gallon which could add up to $1,000 or more to a full repaint B. most times I'm in the paint store homeowners are kind of pushed to the foreground as they handle all the contractors in the store and C. Paint is heavy, takes up a lot of room needs to be left in it clean dry area and I hate to put a client to work when they are trying to hire me to do their job.
Getting multiple bids is even more important in the state of Georgia, since contractors of any sort are not required to obtain licensing in order to operate. That makes hiring a painter in the Peach State a bit of a crapshoot, since anybody with a ladder and a paint brush can claim to be professional-grade painter, whether they've got the experience not. This is also why it's not just important to collect multiple bids, but to ask for references and follow up on them. Talking to former customers about their experiences is the best way to go if you want to be absolutely sure you're going to get a quality paint job and with a great price.
Generally, it will take a minimum of two gallons of paint to cover a room. At the highest end, paint will cost anywhere between $30 and $60 per gallon and come in three different finishes: flat, semi-gloss or high-gloss. Flat finishes are the least shiny and are best suited for areas requiring frequent cleaning. Semi-gloss finishes are a bit shiny but can also be easily cleaned. A high-gloss finish is stain-resistant and easy to clean. Traditionally, living rooms should be painted with a flat finish to allow the paint to stand out. Glossy finishes should be reserved for hallways, and a semi-gloss is best suited for trim. Invest in pre-primed paint whenever possible. This cuts down on time by combining the layering process. Almost any paint job will require a primer, which will cost anywhere from $7 to $15 per can. Primer helps the paint to stand out against the underlayer of paint it's covering, especially if the new paint is lighter than the old coat. You will need at least two cans of primer, if not more, to cover one wall. Here are some paint brands and their average price per gallon:
The Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule establishes requirements for firms and individuals performing renovations, and affects contractors, property managers, and others who disturb painted surfaces.  It applies to work in houses, apartments, and child-occupied facilities (such as schools and day-care centers) built before 1978.  It includes pre-renovation education requirements as well as training, firm certification, and work practice requirements. 

Painting Contractor

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