I would never suggest that one of my clients buy their own paint because A . They will pay an average of $20 to $30 more per gallon which could add up to $1,000 or more to a full repaint B. most times I'm in the paint store homeowners are kind of pushed to the foreground as they handle all the contractors in the store and C. Paint is heavy, takes up a lot of room needs to be left in it clean dry area and I hate to put a client to work when they are trying to hire me to do their job.
If you decide to paint multiple rooms in your home, choose colors that relate to one another without being completely the same -- unless uniformity is your goal, of course. Costs may vary based on differences in color, gloss and room size. However, each room will flow depending on the trim's color -- which should all be white or neutral -- so they look connected. A whole-house color scheme presents the same cost factors as painting multiple rooms individually: colors you choose, the gloss, the size of the rooms and time/labor. You can choose to use the same color throughout your entire home to save on money, or you can use a color scheme with the same gloss throughout, though this isn't recommended for selling purposes.

OF the different type of customers there are at least two: cheap charley's and people who want great results. I agree the need for wall repair is critical to the end results. Most critical is for the customer to be told ahead that the walls are going to need exactly what is needed. This means the contractor must look, touch, examine the walls for defects and needed work. I've been a building manager for 40 years and seen a few paint jobs. Typically a contractor does a lot of talking about how expert he is, but the guys who walk through with note pads, iPads, examine, measure, point things out, explain and recommend are the ones I will deal with. It confirms if they know what the business. Nobody likes the workers to show up and when you talk about the job they're going to do they know nothing but they we were told to be here. Their boss who bid the job doesn't supervise - a big no no around here. Nobody likes surprises or worse, at the end of a job that's not right getting a bunch of little kid excuses. Contractors that do not like the customer to be around looking at the progress don't get the job.
Some proposals simply say to paint the walls and ceiling and never specify the number of coats to be applied. If the colors are similar enough, it's possible to get away with one coat of paint and not discount your pricing. No matter how hard you try, tiny, pin-sized air holes will pop exposing the original walls. This may not bother you if you can't notice it, but principally speaking you should have paid your painter less for the work. 

Journalist Martin Aston passed on a tape that Mark Eitzel had given to him. Never before or since had I received a demo that was 90 minutes long! In fact, it was quite some time before I actually listened to the whole thing all the way through. Every morning and evening, driving to and from work, I would start at the beginning, "24" (I know, I know, what more do you need to hear, right? What a song.), but only get about half way through that and whatever the second song on the tape was before arriving home/at 4AD. When I finally did listen to the full 90 minutes I called young Mark K. and left him a message. I learned later he was sitting in the bath listening to me talk. It was a perfect time for me to hear that brilliant band.
I managed commercial construction projects for many years, have built and remodeled several properties, and never once have I encountered any of these scams. The tone of this article is deeply troubling. The author seems to be saying that ALL painting contractors are inherently dishonest, and that has not been my experience. The underlying advice here is sound: get it all in writing and cover as many contingencies as possible--so pointing out potential pitfalls like coat coverage is helpful. But do that in the spirit of clear communication of expectations, not with the expectation that the person you are hiring will try to cheat you at every turn. Not every contractor takes outrageous advantage of change orders; not every contractor will sneak past necessary preparation and/or repairs. Contractors of all sorts get a bad rap as it is; reinforcing a stereotype with articles written from this point of view just seems unproductive.

Load flat or eggshell exterior paint color into paint sprayer. Depending on intensity of hue, apply one or two coats of flat or eggshell exterior paint to entire house. Be sure to work your way from top to bottom in a smooth, controlled manner, overlapping each stroke by 8 inches. TIP: When changing exterior color from light to dark or dark to light, start with a coat of primer to ensure proper coverage. Primer is not necessary when a fresh coat of existing color is being applied.
If you paint over dirty, oily surfaces, the paint will easily chip or peel off. So before painting, clean grimy areas with a deglosser or heavy-duty cleaner intended for prepaint cleaning. They work well to clean painted, varnished or enameled surfaces to improve the adhesion of the new paint. They’re ideal for cleaning greasy or oily areas like kitchen and bathroom walls and removing hand marks around light switches and doorknobs.
I am a painting contractor and have been since 2001. Make sure the estimate provides in writing: What is EXCLUDED as well as INCLUDED. It should state the manufacturer and type of paint going to be used. Estimate says ALL LABOR AND MATERIALS. My estimates to my customers say "guaranteed coverage" eliminates the conversations of 1 coat vs 2 coat. I have my customers submit colors 5 days prior to start date. Customers need to inform me if they are going to use pure white, dark reds, oranges, and bright yellows they need to inform me in that 5 day window, so I can adjust my pricing for 3 coats. Although this more uncommon now than years past because a lot of paint manufacturers have primer with paint products. Let the contractor know if your doing accent walls. This takes longer to cut in straight lines and it requires the contractor to purchase more paint. If you add anything on the scope of work have the painter write out the description and cost prior to them doing the work. Have the estimate say how many days it will take to perform the work. Ask how many workers will be doing the job. Make sure to enforce that number of workers their everyday until the job is complete. Do not give final payment until you do a final walk through. Walk the job when its almost complete and point out areas that you want fixed prior to the contractors final walk through. Its best to do while the workers are still in that particular area as they will have tarps down and areas covered and it will be easier for them to take care of. Purchase a roll of blue tape and stick it to areas that you want fixed. This is called a punch list.
Over time, even the best paint job needs a new coat. Old paint peels and fades and those colors that were all the rage ten years ago can start to look a bit dated. With your busy schedule, you've got no time to pick up a paintbrush, and you've just remembered that your in-laws are in town for dinner next week! We hear stories like this all the time, and our reply is always the same: don't panic! Book a painting professional through the Handy platform. Wall painting shouldn’t be stressful and when you use the Handy platform, it won’t be.
Only a dummy gets involved with so-called "contractors." Hire a qualified actual worker yourself. Check out their resume/background, etc. RULE #1..NO ADVANCE DEPOSITS! Pay daily or weekly or upon satisfied completion according your standard, not workers. Contractors are merely employment agents. If that's the way you get work done, then go ahead and waste your money and wind up with the myriad of problems enumerated upon in the news clip above. RULE#2.. NO SMOKERS. They are lighting up on your money. RULE#3: No cell phones while working. Talk on their own time after work
Did you even read the article? It was specifying UNSCRUPULOUS painters! And, by the way, the photo at the top was not identified at all. How would anyone know whether it was done by a homeowner or not? Also did you ever stop to think that if a consumer has the knowlege to spot a dishonest contractor then by default he also has the knowlege to identify an honest one as well? And, pardon me, but just because you've never seen something has absolutely nothing to do with whether it has actually happened to someone else. Why would any honest business person be so defensive about the publishing of such useful information? If any painters/painting contractors object to a consumer having this kind of information maybe they are the dishonest ones!
To industrial and institutional. I also own and operate a professional painting company of elite painters ONLY 5 ELITE PAINTERS, and pay them good money for being elite. Less is better in my opinion.The fact is this a homeowner and a painting company owner can both be taken advantage of by hustlers and liars and amateurs posing as pros. I have had many laborers tell me they can paint. " Oh yes sir I can paint, I'm a painter of 8 years. Yes sir I can cut a straight line." Some people will say and do anything to get a buck. If yoir on the job to see their rookie mistakes you may have time to save your reputation before disaster ensues and fire them on the spot. As a painting Company owner if your not on the job with your crew at least 3 out of 6 days every week your taking a huge risk of damaging your reputation and losing the respect of your team. Homeowners want to deal with you or the crew boss (jobs site supervisor) not "the painter". Many things I have read are right on. Painters for the most part will milk a clock for all they can and still do a good job. But amateurs will leave your projects in shambles and the only ones to pay for it is the contractor and the homeowners. But an elite painter and crew will try to complete a project as quickly as possible and move on to the next one. They understand bonuses, incentives, and promotions. My company provides the opportunity for a homeowner to meet each member of the crew and shake there hand on day one. There is also a differentiation between the crew boss and the crew by the uniforms they wear. Should the homeowners have any issue at all they know exactly who to go to to get results. This eliminates the age old problem of who screwed up? I have found that by me putting on my whites and giving my crew the opportunity to out do themselves on each project it ignites competition, pride in skill, and excellent commraderie amongst the team. We all hold each other accountable. Choose your contractor by the crew not the owner. The crew is a direct reflection of the Company owner. No room for rookies on fine finish painting. Go pro for painting and you won't regret it. With that being said homeowners should always remember that you get what you pay for. With paint and services. In most cases it will be well worth a few extra bucks to get elite results. Never go with the cheapest bid there is always a reason why it's so low.
I have a Home Improvement/Painting business, and Angie's List always advertises that that everyone is out to get them. Of course there are people who try to take advantage of homeowners My reputation and repeat business is based on word of mouth. Shoddy work is always a way to get put out of business quick. As far as strictly painting, preparation is a big factor in getting a quality paint job. If you don't prepare the surfaces you are painting you are spinning your wheels, and wasting money, no matter what paint you use. Getting a deposit from a customer is beneficial, but not always necessary. Sometimes it is a godsend, when you get stuck by the customer, which has happened to me more than once
I disagree with your criteria to hire a painter. A prompt returned call is nice but does not indicate the quality or fairness of the painter. As far as a written estimate, that should be more of a qualifier for the bid versus an evaluation criterion. I'm not sure one would have favorable results by hiring a painter on this basis. As far as the bidding process, change orders should ONLY be used if the customer requests additional scope (PMP 101). Angie's list should consider asking reviewers if/how much they were told to pay compared with the estimate. Unfortunately, there are a lot of contractors that are unethical and need to be accountable.
As an owners rep and former estimator for a gc i do expect to pay a reasonable deposit say 10 percent and then weekly progress payments. I am asking the painter to book his time and to do the work on my schedule. Most painting companies are not huge operations they will pay their staff weekly. For most repaints i ask for one tinted primer coat and one finish coat for 100 percent coverage. New work gets one tinted primer and two finish coats for 100 percent coverage. The cost of the paint is not really that different for colors or finish. Brands like european fine paint and C2 are more expensive than Ben Moore and sometimes more difficult to roll based on their consistency. Some home depot brands are as expensive as the Ben Moore and of equal quality others aren't. Red paints are notorious for number of coats required and special priming requirements.
Picking exterior house paint colors is a lot different than picking a color for a shirt or a car.  It may help to drive around to observe colors that other homeowners have combined on homes that are of similar size and design as yours.  There are also online resources that provide homeowners with the ability to create virtual makeovers of their home by combining colors together through their software programs as well.
the price can always be adjusted based on on or off season, amount of colors to be used. A job like this can be done in 2 days and much quicker with a helper. I charge a bit more than others just because its quality work done professionally. Theres others that charge more than this just because they can on the on season and most people dont get a 2nd bid...
Inspect the surface area for holes, cracks or other problems and apply acrylic caulk to fill them in. Use a putty knife to smooth out the caulk and remove any excess to prevent bumps. For particularly thin or narrow crevices, you may have to use your finger to smooth out the caulk. Caulk contracts and shrinks, so apply a second layer once it's dried.
Consider purchasing supplies personally to save money. Ask the painter for a bid that separates labor and materials. Then explain that you'll purchase the materials and ask for a list of exactly what will be needed to complete the job. Caulking, for example, is an extra supply commonly used to fill any cracks or damaged areas in your walls -- and one that might be overlooked in an incomplete list.
Hi Donnie, Thanks for your comment! We would be happy to help you connect with a fencing pro to give you an estimate on your project. You can submit a request to our pros here: www.homeadvisor.com, browse a list of local pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html, or send your info to emailus@homeadvisor.com and a project advisor will reach out to assist you. –HASupport
We used FHP to paint the interior of our home and  were very satisfied with their work. Joe, the owner, was always available to answer any questions I had. He put up samples for us in each room so we could choose the best color. They prepped the house well and the end product was more than expected! His price was fair compared to competitors. FHP finished the project in a timely manner . He even offered to come back and touch up the paint after we have moved in ! I would recommend FHP for any job!
The article was well-intended, but it makes it sound like painters are the crooks and consumers are innocent victims. That is blatantly un-true. Maybe there should be a follow-up article that educates consumers how not to be shysters by expecting a ton more than they said at the start, or not paying the balance of the job unless something else is done that was not in the contract. Tradesmen have a rough road when dealing with consumers that have short arms but long lists of by-the-way items. No, I'm not a painter...
The graph says the average cost to paint a home interior is $1600; at the high end, $4,000. But for what size home? I'm getting estimates for painting an 1800 square foot townhome in the range of about $6500 - which includes sanding and repainting all doors, and painting all trim, walls and ceilings. What does the range above include and for how big of a home? Thanks.
{ "galleryConfig" : {"galleryTitle":"Videos","galleryItems":[{"id":null,"title":"Structural Repair","url":"http://vimeo.com/229142342","mediaSources":null,"description":"Hazards and proper protection while cutting, grinding, welding.","duration":"5:33","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649374900_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOiUDl4xTsMb8+0quFv997QgNdWvZz2Mbmg8j7OjOgbVQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGP+jFPOyZ3ee6DwfQI8JX24ZFxnZmPEyIqLsTlFciGOsw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Surface Preparation","url":"http://vimeo.com/229114680","mediaSources":null,"description":"Sanding, body filler, solvent wipe down, masking.","duration":"5:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649340426_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMPQ/0SzwNC3qxmyzA8rh00JfmhCsY9z0rrOPlnSeOSvA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMqwTDDrdISKJcoFG8R0GddY6B6Mr2/EiEafjBSbL0SbQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Painting","url":"http://vimeo.com/229184542","mediaSources":null,"description":"Mixing coatings, spraying paint, gun cleaning, unmasking.","duration":"12:37","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649429175_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNhkGLICbyNlpZf/0EhR5YbWUtqEe8183loncNEzZwGsA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNJ2dENagcj+OrbkimC85zy6ras5C1T9u1nBUl9fGxnYg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Overview)","url":"http://vimeo.com/229115324","mediaSources":null,"description":"Choosing the best type respirator for your tasks, fit testing","duration":"03:49","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649341202_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNtImajjNHe6jARBiHcD6VuepuJy0zv0FvKpqmb8JUNRg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOSyvZoO5VShIctdMhYrO1ZSYUXz4tfP32j02f90eXfFw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Cleaning and Storage)","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865270","mediaSources":null,"description":"How to clean and maintain your respirator.","duration":"1:46","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649027412_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf4nf0pOeIZcw+VAfgeGBpy0AaSxT7b2QvnLKXY3ZpVyuQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf6dcUZO3dHOxWIvJ+SgFrwgcao7j60JKvPDJahmfVir4Q== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Donning a Half Mask Respirator) ","url":"http://vimeo.com/229146171","mediaSources":null,"description":"Putting on (donning) and fitting a respirator, pressure checks.","duration":"1:57","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649379748_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMkSWDfi0it7h5AX6KfLIovgb+7GyvMtXXt34r9qBjDXQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNa9+q+2lXYwFigwR5wFjtuqcyyAuBkZmAv86gMxzrunQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Chemical Resistant Gloves","url":"http://vimeo.com/228970893","mediaSources":null,"description":"Gloves to protect against solvents, isocyanates and dusts","duration":"02:23","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649161993_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8hjG/6VSgBBA23GFpzQ5vrSEdT1sdNAWrIfRJelqOAEQg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8iVC8uiDwyTy73nbFlsCCU1jmdouKKtJvd5XCoIF3RLrg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Isocyanate Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229123604","mediaSources":null,"description":"Isocyanates can cause asthma and airway irritation .","duration":"6:06","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649351377_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGM+LTxO7+opIKVkifEOFsC6cAa7qyBAOoTwcZcKylUeIQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNToiixt8ivhkn14FvljjLq4oFgFgi/rZZhhOSDo3Qe5A== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Solvent Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229167358","mediaSources":null,"description":"Effects of solvent exposure: skin, nervous system, liver, etc.","duration":"03:26","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649407194_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BePhRTr7dbZIdQdP6K/RHlVvJZ33hOEbslHHahu2n/+qzQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeMUXLf4Bhuxq/WQ0stgUJ8ofKafv4dkRuhy+ly27/70MQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Sources of Information","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865887","mediaSources":null,"description":"MSDSs, routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of exposure","duration":"03:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649028172_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf5/d77jNMgv0uxh2lleucWIelZHfuxL/Y9qMtSOvx87sA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf60tYR5hWn95e5+iSGICXG5Ty9pruywoJUwZiJy1iK/lQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0}],"itemsToLoadIds":[],"slideRowsCount":0}, "displayStyle": "video-gallery-widget" }

Home Painter Company

×