Repaint — exteriors especially — before visible signs of wear appear, Bancroft says. Don’t wait until you see peeling or flaking paint. “If I have to spend 40 hours preparing the surface before we can paint, that time is going to result in a lot of extra costs. But if I can spend 10 hours preparing the surfaces to be painted, you’re going to save money,” Freeman says.

This article with comments was terrific - it was so informative. I found the advice useful. It addressed specifics like the condition of the dry wall surfaces, any additional repairs such. pin holes, chalking, smoothing of wall surfaces, absorption of paint and number of coats that may be needed. It should also include insurance coverage, and reflect the clean-up afterwards. Having a written contract with the company's letterhead is a must.

{ "galleryConfig" : {"galleryTitle":"Videos","galleryItems":[{"id":null,"title":"Structural Repair","url":"http://vimeo.com/229142342","mediaSources":null,"description":"Hazards and proper protection while cutting, grinding, welding.","duration":"5:33","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649374900_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOiUDl4xTsMb8+0quFv997QgNdWvZz2Mbmg8j7OjOgbVQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGP+jFPOyZ3ee6DwfQI8JX24ZFxnZmPEyIqLsTlFciGOsw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Surface Preparation","url":"http://vimeo.com/229114680","mediaSources":null,"description":"Sanding, body filler, solvent wipe down, masking.","duration":"5:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649340426_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMPQ/0SzwNC3qxmyzA8rh00JfmhCsY9z0rrOPlnSeOSvA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMqwTDDrdISKJcoFG8R0GddY6B6Mr2/EiEafjBSbL0SbQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Painting","url":"http://vimeo.com/229184542","mediaSources":null,"description":"Mixing coatings, spraying paint, gun cleaning, unmasking.","duration":"12:37","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649429175_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNhkGLICbyNlpZf/0EhR5YbWUtqEe8183loncNEzZwGsA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNJ2dENagcj+OrbkimC85zy6ras5C1T9u1nBUl9fGxnYg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Overview)","url":"http://vimeo.com/229115324","mediaSources":null,"description":"Choosing the best type respirator for your tasks, fit testing","duration":"03:49","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649341202_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNtImajjNHe6jARBiHcD6VuepuJy0zv0FvKpqmb8JUNRg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOSyvZoO5VShIctdMhYrO1ZSYUXz4tfP32j02f90eXfFw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Cleaning and Storage)","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865270","mediaSources":null,"description":"How to clean and maintain your respirator.","duration":"1:46","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649027412_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf4nf0pOeIZcw+VAfgeGBpy0AaSxT7b2QvnLKXY3ZpVyuQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf6dcUZO3dHOxWIvJ+SgFrwgcao7j60JKvPDJahmfVir4Q== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Donning a Half Mask Respirator) ","url":"http://vimeo.com/229146171","mediaSources":null,"description":"Putting on (donning) and fitting a respirator, pressure checks.","duration":"1:57","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649379748_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMkSWDfi0it7h5AX6KfLIovgb+7GyvMtXXt34r9qBjDXQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNa9+q+2lXYwFigwR5wFjtuqcyyAuBkZmAv86gMxzrunQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Chemical Resistant Gloves","url":"http://vimeo.com/228970893","mediaSources":null,"description":"Gloves to protect against solvents, isocyanates and dusts","duration":"02:23","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649161993_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8hjG/6VSgBBA23GFpzQ5vrSEdT1sdNAWrIfRJelqOAEQg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8iVC8uiDwyTy73nbFlsCCU1jmdouKKtJvd5XCoIF3RLrg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Isocyanate Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229123604","mediaSources":null,"description":"Isocyanates can cause asthma and airway irritation .","duration":"6:06","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649351377_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGM+LTxO7+opIKVkifEOFsC6cAa7qyBAOoTwcZcKylUeIQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNToiixt8ivhkn14FvljjLq4oFgFgi/rZZhhOSDo3Qe5A== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Solvent Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229167358","mediaSources":null,"description":"Effects of solvent exposure: skin, nervous system, liver, etc.","duration":"03:26","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649407194_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BePhRTr7dbZIdQdP6K/RHlVvJZ33hOEbslHHahu2n/+qzQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeMUXLf4Bhuxq/WQ0stgUJ8ofKafv4dkRuhy+ly27/70MQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Sources of Information","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865887","mediaSources":null,"description":"MSDSs, routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of exposure","duration":"03:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649028172_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf5/d77jNMgv0uxh2lleucWIelZHfuxL/Y9qMtSOvx87sA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf60tYR5hWn95e5+iSGICXG5Ty9pruywoJUwZiJy1iK/lQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0}],"itemsToLoadIds":[],"slideRowsCount":0}, "displayStyle": "video-gallery-widget" }
A fresh coat of paint makes everything it touches seem brand new. But such new beginnings cost real money. Professional painters charge around $4,000 for labor and materials to paint the exterior of a 2,500-square-foot, two-story home and roughly $5,500 for the interior. Painters’ rates may range from $20 to $60 an hour, but around $40 is typical in urban areas.
If you decide to paint multiple rooms in your home, choose colors that relate to one another without being completely the same -- unless uniformity is your goal, of course. Costs may vary based on differences in color, gloss and room size. However, each room will flow depending on the trim's color -- which should all be white or neutral -- so they look connected. A whole-house color scheme presents the same cost factors as painting multiple rooms individually: colors you choose, the gloss, the size of the rooms and time/labor. You can choose to use the same color throughout your entire home to save on money, or you can use a color scheme with the same gloss throughout, though this isn't recommended for selling purposes.
To industrial and institutional. I also own and operate a professional painting company of elite painters ONLY 5 ELITE PAINTERS, and pay them good money for being elite. Less is better in my opinion.The fact is this a homeowner and a painting company owner can both be taken advantage of by hustlers and liars and amateurs posing as pros. I have had many laborers tell me they can paint. " Oh yes sir I can paint, I'm a painter of 8 years. Yes sir I can cut a straight line." Some people will say and do anything to get a buck. If yoir on the job to see their rookie mistakes you may have time to save your reputation before disaster ensues and fire them on the spot. As a painting Company owner if your not on the job with your crew at least 3 out of 6 days every week your taking a huge risk of damaging your reputation and losing the respect of your team. Homeowners want to deal with you or the crew boss (jobs site supervisor) not "the painter". Many things I have read are right on. Painters for the most part will milk a clock for all they can and still do a good job. But amateurs will leave your projects in shambles and the only ones to pay for it is the contractor and the homeowners. But an elite painter and crew will try to complete a project as quickly as possible and move on to the next one. They understand bonuses, incentives, and promotions. My company provides the opportunity for a homeowner to meet each member of the crew and shake there hand on day one. There is also a differentiation between the crew boss and the crew by the uniforms they wear. Should the homeowners have any issue at all they know exactly who to go to to get results. This eliminates the age old problem of who screwed up? I have found that by me putting on my whites and giving my crew the opportunity to out do themselves on each project it ignites competition, pride in skill, and excellent commraderie amongst the team. We all hold each other accountable. Choose your contractor by the crew not the owner. The crew is a direct reflection of the Company owner. No room for rookies on fine finish painting. Go pro for painting and you won't regret it. With that being said homeowners should always remember that you get what you pay for. With paint and services. In most cases it will be well worth a few extra bucks to get elite results. Never go with the cheapest bid there is always a reason why it's so low.
Residential house painters on the Handy platform have used countless gallons of paint and tons of brushes over the years. With a wealth of experience under their belts, they know the best, quickest and most cost-effective ways to get the work done. From how to achieve that perfect glossy finish to ensuring no paint drips onto your crown molding, you might find yourself picking up a few tips!
Steve, not only did you come off with an edge regarding the article written for Angie's list but you came awfully close to being slanderous. The article was written if you will have read his bio by a very well established professional painter. The issue regarding the deposit was put in question by a responder. I have read your response in full as you suggested, and companies as large as yours are just as likely to use the tricks of the trade as the small guy as you suggest, if not more so. A large company has less oversight and workers get lazy with the boss not looking over their shoulder. I have had experience in this area, and thought that i was dealing with a very reputable company that had been recommended by a couple friends, my insurance company, and my adjuster who had dealt with the company. I had terrible problems with the company, who do full restorations and like your company paint in all areas. To finalize your statement that Established businesses do not cheat customers is completly false and is a very misleading statement. I am suprised that Angies list allowed you to post such an outragious comment. All you have to do is look in the Civil lawsuits section of the Established businesses that are being sued or are under investigation for fraud and cheating their customers!
As you walk through your lighted rooms (preferably day light) see if the new coat has light spots showing the precious paint. This is call "bleeding through". This means that there's only one coat of paint or the paint was diluted or the trasition of colors were from light to dark (or the other way around) and primer was not use or the painter is inexperienced.
If the point of hiring a well established, experienced, reputable painting contractor is to secure the professionalism and trust suggested to be inherent with that choice, then I would EXPECT that professionalism and experience to include the ability to make the proper and correct calculations for labor and materials for a fixed price quote, and there should be NO reason for the contractor to put the cost burden of their miscalculation on the consumer.
Specify whether the contractor or you will supply the paint. Check Consumer Reports' paint ratings: In its tests, some relatively inexpensive paints performed better than more expensive paints and cost $10 to $20 less per gallon. But keep in mind that most paints will resist cracking, peeling, mold and mildew. Who does the painting — and how well they do it — is more important than what's in the bucket.
Painting your home, both inside and out, improves its curb appeal, character and resale value. Painting is one of the quickest and easiest ways to give your home a face-lift -- and it yields some of the most dramatic results as well. If you have ever visited the painting section of your local hardware store, you know how overwhelming the multitude of paint choices can be. In addition to colors, there are finishes, stains, maintenance and other options to consider. And, if you're interested in adding a mural or trompe l'oeil, you're looking at a whole different set of choices and associated costs.

We've heard countless stories of people who have been let down by other house painting services. No one wants to take valuable time off of work to wait for painters who never show up. At Handy, we pride ourselves on connecting our customers with reliable and trustworthy residential house painters. They will arrive on time, fully ready to do your job.

Maybe you've just moved into a new home, and you haven't got around to buying brushes and rollers yet. Perhaps you're worried that your brush-skills aren't that good, and you won't achieve that professional-looking finish that you’re really going for. Handy professionals will turn up with everything they need to get the job done, from ladders and brushes, to rollers and tarps. You just have to provide the interior paint and primer!
OF the different type of customers there are at least two: cheap charley's and people who want great results. I agree the need for wall repair is critical to the end results. Most critical is for the customer to be told ahead that the walls are going to need exactly what is needed. This means the contractor must look, touch, examine the walls for defects and needed work. I've been a building manager for 40 years and seen a few paint jobs. Typically a contractor does a lot of talking about how expert he is, but the guys who walk through with note pads, iPads, examine, measure, point things out, explain and recommend are the ones I will deal with. It confirms if they know what the business. Nobody likes the workers to show up and when you talk about the job they're going to do they know nothing but they we were told to be here. Their boss who bid the job doesn't supervise - a big no no around here. Nobody likes surprises or worse, at the end of a job that's not right getting a bunch of little kid excuses. Contractors that do not like the customer to be around looking at the progress don't get the job.

For starters, a smart Atlanta homeowner should always start out by collecting bids from multiple contractors (we recommend at least three) before settling on a specific home painter in Atlanta to paint their home. Why? First of all, it's just good business. Comparing estimates allows you to weed out bids that are too high and too low, encourages competition between contractors so that you get the best price possible, and it allows you to compare portfolios, references, and personal impressions. Even if you choose to use a contractor referral service like HomeAdvisor.com, who pre-screens contractors and provides customer rankings for your convenience, it's still smart shopping to cast a wide net when it comes to finding a painter in the ATL. Click Here Painting Contractor Denver, CO

×