This article with comments was terrific - it was so informative. I found the advice useful. It addressed specifics like the condition of the dry wall surfaces, any additional repairs such. pin holes, chalking, smoothing of wall surfaces, absorption of paint and number of coats that may be needed. It should also include insurance coverage, and reflect the clean-up afterwards. Having a written contract with the company's letterhead is a must. 

Disclaimer: NerdWallet strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Pre-qualified offers are not binding. If you find discrepancies with your credit score or information from your credit report, please contact TransUnion® directly.

© 2018 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18). Your California Privacy Rights. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices. CN Entertainment.
Ask companies to include all details in writing. Although that sounds simple enough, too many contractors submit offers such as "paint house for $5,000." A friendly contractor may offer a reassuring handshake and promise that the crew will take care of all the details — starting on time, working every day, cleaning up, etc. That's great, but why not include each point in the proposal? If it's a challenge to get a written description of labor, materials and other details, things will probably get worse when the work starts.
I put out a request for bids to several local house painters and quite a few seemed high. One was for over $6000 for painting the exterior of the house with putty fill as necessary, paint included. It was for him and one other guy to do the work. I said, "it's going to take you guys quite a while to get this job done" and he told me that no, they could do it in 2 days. I don't know about you but $1500 a day per painter seems more than just a bit high. I went with someone else and they had several people there for several days working like crazy and did a great job. There are too many scammers.
to be the devils advocate i have been a building contractor 20 of the last 30 yrs. i do know that if you go to a higher sheen of paint and or darker colors then any imperfections in the walls will show up much more dramatically…therefore the painter or a good drywall finisher is needed to prepare the walls extensively. this could cause more expenses…for it takes a lot of time to prep walls (smooth walls..not textured walls) and this cost has to be absorbed.
EPA's Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requires that firms performing renovation, repair, and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in homes, child care facilities and pre-schools built before 1978 have their firm certified by EPA (or an EPA authorized state), use certified renovators who are trained by EPA-approved training providers and follow lead-safe work practices.
Welcome to Repairs and Paints! We are your Top Rated Local® interior and exterior pro painters. In fact, we were voted the best residential painters of 2017. For over 15 years, we have been providing homeowners and business owners with top of the line interior and exterior painting. No matter how large, or small your professional painting needs are, Repairs and Paints has got you covered. Our professional painting staff is reliable, timely, experienced, and affordable. Simply pick your color(s) and watch our experienced staff strategically paint your home interior.
This company painted my house about one year ago. We have paint peeling off the exterior of the house now. We have left many messages for him to come out and fix the problem, he gave us a warranty incase this type of thing happened. We bought the best paint and primer the problem was in the prep work, that's why its peeling off of the house. Basically 3500 bucks down the tube be aware his warranty is worthless...
"Bear Creek Painting did a great job on my house trim. I was having new gutters put on my house but realized that the trim needed to be scraped and painted. Nick was able to get his crew out within a few days. Their work was excellent, timely and Nick was professional and responsive to my need to get the work done quickly. I would definitely use Bear Creek painting for my next painting project."

Are you looking for interior house painters that are local, reliable and the best at what they do? Does the idea of painting the walls of your home fill you with dread? If you want to get the best results with minimal fuss, then make Handy your first choice when you need to connect with expert painting contractors. From preparing your interior walls and ceilings to achieving a neat, professional finish, Handy will put you in touch with the right people for the job. Customize your request by specifying your job details, from how many painters you need to how long you’ll need them. We’ll connect you with the painting professionals that suit you best with no compromise on quality.
I used to work at Sherwin Williams. The best thing to do is specify that you will purchase your own paint. If the painter objects strenuously, he was plaanning on making money in the ways this article outlines. You might pay a few dollars more for paint, but you will have control of the quality of what goes on your walls. Never skimp on paint quality.

to be the devils advocate i have been a building contractor 20 of the last 30 yrs. i do know that if you go to a higher sheen of paint and or darker colors then any imperfections in the walls will show up much more dramatically…therefore the painter or a good drywall finisher is needed to prepare the walls extensively. this could cause more expenses…for it takes a lot of time to prep walls (smooth walls..not textured walls) and this cost has to be absorbed.
The contents of this web page are Copyright © 2018 Wilson & Hampton Inc. Painting Contractors. All Rights Reserved. Providing commercial & industrial painting in Southern California serving Orange County, Los Angeles County, San Diego County, Riverside County, San Bernardino County, Imperial Valley, Santa Barbara County, Ventura County & Kern County

Before we start, you will have to choose your color. If you would like to replicate a color already on your wall, you can use an old can of paint for reference, or you can take a chip to the paint store. We can help you identify the color, the finish, and type of paint with our visualizer tools, and we also offer a Color Consulting Service if you need help coming to a decision.

Hi Elaine, We would be happy to get you connected with a painting and wallpaper pro. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/ or browse reviews for local pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to emailus@homeadvisor.com. –HASupport
Another good rule of thumb is to test out colors on your home before you start. Once you’ve noted what others have done, and have visited a paint supply retailer to get some more ideas, test out a few potential colors on a nondescript part of your home just to make sure it’s what you expect. Colors that look fantastic on a tiny brochure can strike you a lot differently when they’re covering an area of a couple square feet. Try out a few options so you can compare them, and give yourself a few days to mull over your impressions. Taking this advice can save you the dilemma of what to do those 20 gallon buckets of “Green Myth” that you quickly realized looked more like split pea soup once you started slopping it on.

Painting is a skilled job with plenty of room for error, from knowing how to prepare the appropriate surface to understanding the best interior paint for the situation. When you book through Handy, we match your job’s requirements with experienced house painters who will leave you completely satisfied. They'll arrive with the right equipment in hand, ready to roll.


OF the different type of customers there are at least two: cheap charley's and people who want great results. I agree the need for wall repair is critical to the end results. Most critical is for the customer to be told ahead that the walls are going to need exactly what is needed. This means the contractor must look, touch, examine the walls for defects and needed work. I've been a building manager for 40 years and seen a few paint jobs. Typically a contractor does a lot of talking about how expert he is, but the guys who walk through with note pads, iPads, examine, measure, point things out, explain and recommend are the ones I will deal with. It confirms if they know what the business. Nobody likes the workers to show up and when you talk about the job they're going to do they know nothing but they we were told to be here. Their boss who bid the job doesn't supervise - a big no no around here. Nobody likes surprises or worse, at the end of a job that's not right getting a bunch of little kid excuses. Contractors that do not like the customer to be around looking at the progress don't get the job.
For interior paint I prefer the semi-gloss, provides a very subtle sheen and is super easy to clean -no flaking, chipping, etc. I've painted a lot, and found that Sherwin Williams Ovation paint has been the easiest to use, and provides the best coverage. I even painted my ceilings with it and WOW! I was done it no time at all, with perfect coverage.

WOW! I think the guy I hired read this first and I have photos that would make your skin crawl. Bottom line: he got me for $1900.00. Every single thing he painted had to be completely redone....that's when I discovered he did NOT use the colors I picked, he actually used leftover exterior paint from his mother's house! Because I have pets he said things needed to be sealed first and I did agree to that. What I did NOT agree to was using some kind of foul smelling gray stuff ON MY HARDWOOD FLOORS! THEN he painted them BLACK, telling me that all they were good for was covering over with laminate or carpet. He also dripped and tracked paint all over my ceramic tile floors. PLUS left a wet used paint roller in my garden window and had stuff piled in front so I didn't find it until it had dried. I have no idea how much that is going to cost to repair. Then he left without finishing (thank God) but left the "leftover" paint, uncovered, in the rain. Again, hid it so I didn't immediately find it. Obviously we will be going to court but I doubt if I see a penny from him.


Interesting information! We just got scammed in White Stone, Virginia... we chose the same color, but went from a flat to an eggshell finish. I wasn't available to stand over the painter while he painted. For such a detailed job, I marveled at how quickly he finished the project! After he was paid for the job, we discovered all he did was roll paint across the walls and close to the crown, baseboards and detailed trim around windows and doors leaving about an inch or so of the flat finish. By using the same color, he didn't even do the job he was paid to do, which explained why he could finish the job so quickly. By using the same color... he got lucky and passed it off as a completed job not bothering to paint to and cut in around the trim. Upon further evaluation of our walls we could see exactly where he stopped because we could see the difference between the flat and eggshell finishes. There are walls he didn't even bother to paint. Then where he did paint near the crown when we were in the room watching ... he hit the crown moulding and tried to tell us it was already there... and tried to sell us on painting the crown moulding. I am so disgusted and upset!! He'll be hearing from us to rectify the situation.
To win work, contractors generally have to bid against other suppliers. To make an accurate bid, they estimate the time and materials required to complete the job. They measure the area to be painted and discuss the type of finish the customer requires. They assess the quality of the surfaces to work out how much remedial work they must carry out before painting. They might have to remove old paint or wall coverings, or repair cracks and other damage. They also calculate the cost of any essential equipment, such as scaffolding for exterior walls.
Note: Refunds will only be made after EPA verifies fee receipt and deposit by the U.S. Treasury. Firms must notify the Agency in writing in order to qualify for a refund. The date of withdrawal is the date on which the Agency received the withdrawal notification. EPA will not refund fees after granting a firm certification or re-certification. If your application is disapproved, EPA will not refund fees. Refunds are not available for replacing a certificate. Refund and withdrawal requests must be sent to the following address:
Home Works Painting is licensed (Virginia Class A #2705-153298) and insured (Workman’s Comp and General Liability), and has been servicing Northern Virginia since 2005. We pride ourselves on delivering a first class job with exceptional service. Home Works Painting has been selected as Northern Virginia’s Best Pick for painters for the past seven years, and is a member of Painting and Decorating Contractors of America (PDCA).

Lap marks are those ugly stripes caused by uneven layers of paint buildup. They occur when you roll over paint that’s already partly dry. (In warm, dry conditions, latex paint can begin to stiffen in less than a minute!) The key to avoiding lap marks  when doing DIY wall painting is to maintain a “wet edge,” so each stroke of your roller overlaps the previous stroke before the paint can begin to dry.

They clearly CANNOT handle a 10+ tabletop. There were 2 of us that ordered LITERALLY at the same tim...e as everyone else, an hour and fifteen min later, two trips to the manager(to whom I do apologize for having an irate attitude towards), we FINALLY get our food. This is literally the first time I’ve come here, in actuality I’m writing this post while I’m still here. The sad part to this whole thing is that they’ll offer some type cheesy coupon to TRY to accommodate their “short comings”. First impression is a lasting one, THIS PLACE SUCKS AT THEIR FOOD SERVICE....
The graph says the average cost to paint a home interior is $1600; at the high end, $4,000. But for what size home? I'm getting estimates for painting an 1800 square foot townhome in the range of about $6500 - which includes sanding and repainting all doors, and painting all trim, walls and ceilings. What does the range above include and for how big of a home? Thanks.
Generally, it will take a minimum of two gallons of paint to cover a room. At the highest end, paint will cost anywhere between $30 and $60 per gallon and come in three different finishes: flat, semi-gloss or high-gloss. Flat finishes are the least shiny and are best suited for areas requiring frequent cleaning. Semi-gloss finishes are a bit shiny but can also be easily cleaned. A high-gloss finish is stain-resistant and easy to clean. Traditionally, living rooms should be painted with a flat finish to allow the paint to stand out. Glossy finishes should be reserved for hallways, and a semi-gloss is best suited for trim. Invest in pre-primed paint whenever possible. This cuts down on time by combining the layering process. Almost any paint job will require a primer, which will cost anywhere from $7 to $15 per can. Primer helps the paint to stand out against the underlayer of paint it's covering, especially if the new paint is lighter than the old coat. You will need at least two cans of primer, if not more, to cover one wall. Here are some paint brands and their average price per gallon:
Oh, where to begin? Let me start with 'watered down paint'. 25-50% before the material gets to the site? Impossible. You would basically be painting with water at that point. It would be less of a hassle, and cost, to simply use proper material. You would be forced to apply three coats instead of two, as the coverage would be horrible. Whatever cost you think might be saved in materials would be lost in labor.
Being in the business for 25+ years I have had the privilege of working with thousands of clients. Although they all came from different circumstances and backgrounds they all had one common goal in mind. Every one of them wanted to be respected, receive top value for their money, and get the best possible paint job for their most prized possession, their house!
We charge $55 per hour for labor and i constantly hear that is too much. If house cleaners are between 50 and 90 per hour and my lawn cutter gets 70 for an hour I’m always confused that a professional painter with all insurances almost always has to negotiate his or hers hourly wage. It just seems that the painting profession gets very little respect compared to other trades

Good contracts include descriptions of prep work and repairs; paint specs by brand name, type, color and product number; the number of coats; and a full description of the work, including frequently omitted items such as cabinet interiors and shutters. Minimize delays by specifying that, weather permitting, work will be continuous. Get a payment schedule that minimizes the down payment — the more payment you can withhold until the end, the more leverage you'll have to get the job done well and per your specifications. Insist that contractors provide proof that they carry both general liability and workers' compensation coverage.
With that said, here's the reality of that particular scenario. Painters do put water in the paint, but not for reasons you would think. Some materials need to have their viscosity manipulated in order to slow drying time, allowing gravity to 'smooth' out the product for a better finish. It also prevents 'drags' and 'sausages'. I personally try not to do it too often, but from time to time I have to. I want my client to have a proper finish.
{ "galleryConfig" : {"galleryTitle":"Videos","galleryItems":[{"id":null,"title":"Structural Repair","url":"http://vimeo.com/229142342","mediaSources":null,"description":"Hazards and proper protection while cutting, grinding, welding.","duration":"5:33","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649374900_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOiUDl4xTsMb8+0quFv997QgNdWvZz2Mbmg8j7OjOgbVQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGP+jFPOyZ3ee6DwfQI8JX24ZFxnZmPEyIqLsTlFciGOsw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Surface Preparation","url":"http://vimeo.com/229114680","mediaSources":null,"description":"Sanding, body filler, solvent wipe down, masking.","duration":"5:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649340426_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMPQ/0SzwNC3qxmyzA8rh00JfmhCsY9z0rrOPlnSeOSvA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMqwTDDrdISKJcoFG8R0GddY6B6Mr2/EiEafjBSbL0SbQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Painting","url":"http://vimeo.com/229184542","mediaSources":null,"description":"Mixing coatings, spraying paint, gun cleaning, unmasking.","duration":"12:37","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649429175_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNhkGLICbyNlpZf/0EhR5YbWUtqEe8183loncNEzZwGsA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNJ2dENagcj+OrbkimC85zy6ras5C1T9u1nBUl9fGxnYg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Overview)","url":"http://vimeo.com/229115324","mediaSources":null,"description":"Choosing the best type respirator for your tasks, fit testing","duration":"03:49","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649341202_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNtImajjNHe6jARBiHcD6VuepuJy0zv0FvKpqmb8JUNRg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOSyvZoO5VShIctdMhYrO1ZSYUXz4tfP32j02f90eXfFw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Cleaning and Storage)","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865270","mediaSources":null,"description":"How to clean and maintain your respirator.","duration":"1:46","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649027412_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf4nf0pOeIZcw+VAfgeGBpy0AaSxT7b2QvnLKXY3ZpVyuQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf6dcUZO3dHOxWIvJ+SgFrwgcao7j60JKvPDJahmfVir4Q== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Donning a Half Mask Respirator) ","url":"http://vimeo.com/229146171","mediaSources":null,"description":"Putting on (donning) and fitting a respirator, pressure checks.","duration":"1:57","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649379748_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMkSWDfi0it7h5AX6KfLIovgb+7GyvMtXXt34r9qBjDXQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNa9+q+2lXYwFigwR5wFjtuqcyyAuBkZmAv86gMxzrunQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Chemical Resistant Gloves","url":"http://vimeo.com/228970893","mediaSources":null,"description":"Gloves to protect against solvents, isocyanates and dusts","duration":"02:23","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649161993_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8hjG/6VSgBBA23GFpzQ5vrSEdT1sdNAWrIfRJelqOAEQg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8iVC8uiDwyTy73nbFlsCCU1jmdouKKtJvd5XCoIF3RLrg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Isocyanate Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229123604","mediaSources":null,"description":"Isocyanates can cause asthma and airway irritation .","duration":"6:06","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649351377_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGM+LTxO7+opIKVkifEOFsC6cAa7qyBAOoTwcZcKylUeIQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNToiixt8ivhkn14FvljjLq4oFgFgi/rZZhhOSDo3Qe5A== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Solvent Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229167358","mediaSources":null,"description":"Effects of solvent exposure: skin, nervous system, liver, etc.","duration":"03:26","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649407194_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BePhRTr7dbZIdQdP6K/RHlVvJZ33hOEbslHHahu2n/+qzQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeMUXLf4Bhuxq/WQ0stgUJ8ofKafv4dkRuhy+ly27/70MQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Sources of Information","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865887","mediaSources":null,"description":"MSDSs, routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of exposure","duration":"03:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649028172_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf5/d77jNMgv0uxh2lleucWIelZHfuxL/Y9qMtSOvx87sA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf60tYR5hWn95e5+iSGICXG5Ty9pruywoJUwZiJy1iK/lQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0}],"itemsToLoadIds":[],"slideRowsCount":0}, "displayStyle": "video-gallery-widget" } 

Home Painter Company

×