Journalist Martin Aston passed on a tape that Mark Eitzel had given to him. Never before or since had I received a demo that was 90 minutes long! In fact, it was quite some time before I actually listened to the whole thing all the way through. Every morning and evening, driving to and from work, I would start at the beginning, "24" (I know, I know, what more do you need to hear, right? What a song.), but only get about half way through that and whatever the second song on the tape was before arriving home/at 4AD. When I finally did listen to the full 90 minutes I called young Mark K. and left him a message. I learned later he was sitting in the bath listening to me talk. It was a perfect time for me to hear that brilliant band.
{ "galleryConfig" : {"galleryTitle":"Videos","galleryItems":[{"id":null,"title":"Structural Repair","url":"http://vimeo.com/229142342","mediaSources":null,"description":"Hazards and proper protection while cutting, grinding, welding.","duration":"5:33","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649374900_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOiUDl4xTsMb8+0quFv997QgNdWvZz2Mbmg8j7OjOgbVQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGP+jFPOyZ3ee6DwfQI8JX24ZFxnZmPEyIqLsTlFciGOsw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Surface Preparation","url":"http://vimeo.com/229114680","mediaSources":null,"description":"Sanding, body filler, solvent wipe down, masking.","duration":"5:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649340426_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMPQ/0SzwNC3qxmyzA8rh00JfmhCsY9z0rrOPlnSeOSvA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMqwTDDrdISKJcoFG8R0GddY6B6Mr2/EiEafjBSbL0SbQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Painting","url":"http://vimeo.com/229184542","mediaSources":null,"description":"Mixing coatings, spraying paint, gun cleaning, unmasking.","duration":"12:37","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649429175_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNhkGLICbyNlpZf/0EhR5YbWUtqEe8183loncNEzZwGsA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNJ2dENagcj+OrbkimC85zy6ras5C1T9u1nBUl9fGxnYg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Overview)","url":"http://vimeo.com/229115324","mediaSources":null,"description":"Choosing the best type respirator for your tasks, fit testing","duration":"03:49","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649341202_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNtImajjNHe6jARBiHcD6VuepuJy0zv0FvKpqmb8JUNRg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOSyvZoO5VShIctdMhYrO1ZSYUXz4tfP32j02f90eXfFw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Cleaning and Storage)","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865270","mediaSources":null,"description":"How to clean and maintain your respirator.","duration":"1:46","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649027412_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf4nf0pOeIZcw+VAfgeGBpy0AaSxT7b2QvnLKXY3ZpVyuQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf6dcUZO3dHOxWIvJ+SgFrwgcao7j60JKvPDJahmfVir4Q== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Donning a Half Mask Respirator) ","url":"http://vimeo.com/229146171","mediaSources":null,"description":"Putting on (donning) and fitting a respirator, pressure checks.","duration":"1:57","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649379748_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMkSWDfi0it7h5AX6KfLIovgb+7GyvMtXXt34r9qBjDXQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNa9+q+2lXYwFigwR5wFjtuqcyyAuBkZmAv86gMxzrunQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Chemical Resistant Gloves","url":"http://vimeo.com/228970893","mediaSources":null,"description":"Gloves to protect against solvents, isocyanates and dusts","duration":"02:23","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649161993_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8hjG/6VSgBBA23GFpzQ5vrSEdT1sdNAWrIfRJelqOAEQg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8iVC8uiDwyTy73nbFlsCCU1jmdouKKtJvd5XCoIF3RLrg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Isocyanate Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229123604","mediaSources":null,"description":"Isocyanates can cause asthma and airway irritation .","duration":"6:06","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649351377_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGM+LTxO7+opIKVkifEOFsC6cAa7qyBAOoTwcZcKylUeIQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNToiixt8ivhkn14FvljjLq4oFgFgi/rZZhhOSDo3Qe5A== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Solvent Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229167358","mediaSources":null,"description":"Effects of solvent exposure: skin, nervous system, liver, etc.","duration":"03:26","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649407194_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BePhRTr7dbZIdQdP6K/RHlVvJZ33hOEbslHHahu2n/+qzQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeMUXLf4Bhuxq/WQ0stgUJ8ofKafv4dkRuhy+ly27/70MQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Sources of Information","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865887","mediaSources":null,"description":"MSDSs, routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of exposure","duration":"03:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649028172_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf5/d77jNMgv0uxh2lleucWIelZHfuxL/Y9qMtSOvx87sA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf60tYR5hWn95e5+iSGICXG5Ty9pruywoJUwZiJy1iK/lQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0}],"itemsToLoadIds":[],"slideRowsCount":0}, "displayStyle": "video-gallery-widget" }

Home Painter Company


Minor repair and maintenance activities that disturb 6 square feet or less of paint per room inside, or 20 square feet or less on the exterior of a home or building. (Note: Window replacement, and partial and full demolition activities, are always covered regardless of square footage.  Activities designated as “prohibited” are prohibited regardless of square footage.)
Another good rule of thumb is to test out colors on your home before you start. Once you’ve noted what others have done, and have visited a paint supply retailer to get some more ideas, test out a few potential colors on a nondescript part of your home just to make sure it’s what you expect. Colors that look fantastic on a tiny brochure can strike you a lot differently when they’re covering an area of a couple square feet. Try out a few options so you can compare them, and give yourself a few days to mull over your impressions. Taking this advice can save you the dilemma of what to do those 20 gallon buckets of “Green Myth” that you quickly realized looked more like split pea soup once you started slopping it on.
A GREAT Paint Contractor NEVER Asks for a Deposit While some paint contractors may request a deposit before beginning the work, well-established, successful painting professionals have sufficient operating income and can easily afford to purchase materials and make payroll. BE WARY of a contractor who asks for a deposit! If he is unable to purchase materials, he's probably unable to pay his staff. Every year, too many homeowners fall victim to contractors who walk off the job - and out of town - with the deposit in their pockets. If you agree to advance payment of any kind, be sure materials have been purchased and are on your property, leaving you leverage should the contractor default on the work. Bottom Line: GREAT painting contractors NEVER request a deposit.
Not only careful communication is essential, but we would greatly recommend, when you pick out your type and brand of paint that you go and pay for it, with the contractor's discount, which is given by Sherwin-Williams and most paint companies. Then you will know how much paint you purchased and the coverage. If it is possible, inspect the work of the painter daily.
I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02.
Dave, you said it best! Every pro painting contractor truly worth their salt would and should cut and paste exactly what you say here about where customary and legitimate practices and expectations should be in regards to what customers should expect from contractors and how contractors should professionally deal with their customers. By the way, Dave, if you work in the Atlanta area, I would like to hire you! Thank you for your valuable advice!
{ "galleryConfig" : {"galleryTitle":"Videos","galleryItems":[{"id":null,"title":"Structural Repair","url":"http://vimeo.com/229142342","mediaSources":null,"description":"Hazards and proper protection while cutting, grinding, welding.","duration":"5:33","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649374900_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOiUDl4xTsMb8+0quFv997QgNdWvZz2Mbmg8j7OjOgbVQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGP+jFPOyZ3ee6DwfQI8JX24ZFxnZmPEyIqLsTlFciGOsw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Surface Preparation","url":"http://vimeo.com/229114680","mediaSources":null,"description":"Sanding, body filler, solvent wipe down, masking.","duration":"5:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649340426_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMPQ/0SzwNC3qxmyzA8rh00JfmhCsY9z0rrOPlnSeOSvA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMqwTDDrdISKJcoFG8R0GddY6B6Mr2/EiEafjBSbL0SbQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Painting","url":"http://vimeo.com/229184542","mediaSources":null,"description":"Mixing coatings, spraying paint, gun cleaning, unmasking.","duration":"12:37","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649429175_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNhkGLICbyNlpZf/0EhR5YbWUtqEe8183loncNEzZwGsA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNJ2dENagcj+OrbkimC85zy6ras5C1T9u1nBUl9fGxnYg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Overview)","url":"http://vimeo.com/229115324","mediaSources":null,"description":"Choosing the best type respirator for your tasks, fit testing","duration":"03:49","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649341202_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNtImajjNHe6jARBiHcD6VuepuJy0zv0FvKpqmb8JUNRg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOSyvZoO5VShIctdMhYrO1ZSYUXz4tfP32j02f90eXfFw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Cleaning and Storage)","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865270","mediaSources":null,"description":"How to clean and maintain your respirator.","duration":"1:46","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649027412_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf4nf0pOeIZcw+VAfgeGBpy0AaSxT7b2QvnLKXY3ZpVyuQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf6dcUZO3dHOxWIvJ+SgFrwgcao7j60JKvPDJahmfVir4Q== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Donning a Half Mask Respirator) ","url":"http://vimeo.com/229146171","mediaSources":null,"description":"Putting on (donning) and fitting a respirator, pressure checks.","duration":"1:57","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649379748_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMkSWDfi0it7h5AX6KfLIovgb+7GyvMtXXt34r9qBjDXQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNa9+q+2lXYwFigwR5wFjtuqcyyAuBkZmAv86gMxzrunQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Chemical Resistant Gloves","url":"http://vimeo.com/228970893","mediaSources":null,"description":"Gloves to protect against solvents, isocyanates and dusts","duration":"02:23","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649161993_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8hjG/6VSgBBA23GFpzQ5vrSEdT1sdNAWrIfRJelqOAEQg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8iVC8uiDwyTy73nbFlsCCU1jmdouKKtJvd5XCoIF3RLrg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Isocyanate Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229123604","mediaSources":null,"description":"Isocyanates can cause asthma and airway irritation .","duration":"6:06","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649351377_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGM+LTxO7+opIKVkifEOFsC6cAa7qyBAOoTwcZcKylUeIQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNToiixt8ivhkn14FvljjLq4oFgFgi/rZZhhOSDo3Qe5A== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Solvent Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229167358","mediaSources":null,"description":"Effects of solvent exposure: skin, nervous system, liver, etc.","duration":"03:26","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649407194_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BePhRTr7dbZIdQdP6K/RHlVvJZ33hOEbslHHahu2n/+qzQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeMUXLf4Bhuxq/WQ0stgUJ8ofKafv4dkRuhy+ly27/70MQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Sources of Information","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865887","mediaSources":null,"description":"MSDSs, routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of exposure","duration":"03:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649028172_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf5/d77jNMgv0uxh2lleucWIelZHfuxL/Y9qMtSOvx87sA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf60tYR5hWn95e5+iSGICXG5Ty9pruywoJUwZiJy1iK/lQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0}],"itemsToLoadIds":[],"slideRowsCount":0}, "displayStyle": "video-gallery-widget" }

When hiring a contractor it is always best to hire one who is personally referred to you by someone you trust. Hiring through ads or phone book is hit and miss. Check with your local paints stores, they know the good guys from the bottom feeders. Go to the stores that sell the high quality paints like Benjamin Moore(nonpareil), Pittsburg, Sherwin Williams or Glidden. Don't go the the big box stores for referrals, the people there don't know squat!
To win work, contractors generally have to bid against other suppliers. To make an accurate bid, they estimate the time and materials required to complete the job. They measure the area to be painted and discuss the type of finish the customer requires. They assess the quality of the surfaces to work out how much remedial work they must carry out before painting. They might have to remove old paint or wall coverings, or repair cracks and other damage. They also calculate the cost of any essential equipment, such as scaffolding for exterior walls.
Transitioning your painting business away from these mistakes can be difficult, but I guarantee you it’s worth it. You’ll look back at your business and say, ‘How did I even operate that way?’ Once you start doing things more efficiently and reaping the benefits, you’ll be UNABLE to return to your old ways of running things. Try eliminating just 2 of these mistakes and see what happens!
we only use the best interior paint which goes further as far as pricing a repaint we charge 2.00 a square foot floor space for walls ceilings and trim .on new construction using the best paint 3.90 per foot floor space that is with 3 coats on all surfaces but as being a professional for 45 years i recommend use a professional so that your paint will last longer and you wont have to pay to have it done more often i do free consulting in these areas i am more than happy to assist you with your projects 864-506-6666 just always remember good paint last longer and use a washable paint your home is your most valueable investment take care of it
Second: all the tricks of the trade in regard to "cheating" customers is for hustlers and cheaters and NOT established businesses. At the end of the project the job should come out looking professionally painted as specified in the contract. A selected color that takes multiple coats that was not calculated by the contractor should cost more money. It's not the fault of the painter.
When hiring a contractor it is always best to hire one who is personally referred to you by someone you trust. Hiring through ads or phone book is hit and miss. Check with your local paints stores, they know the good guys from the bottom feeders. Go to the stores that sell the high quality paints like Benjamin Moore(nonpareil), Pittsburg, Sherwin Williams or Glidden. Don't go the the big box stores for referrals, the people there don't know squat!
Painting contractors must also carry out administrative and marketing duties. They prepare final accounts for customers based on the original estimates and any additional work. They analyze the cost of the job compared with the estimate to calculate their profit. They market their business through activities such as setting up websites, asking customers for references or contacting property maintenance companies with details of their services.

We used FHP to paint the interior of our home and  were very satisfied with their work. Joe, the owner, was always available to answer any questions I had. He put up samples for us in each room so we could choose the best color. They prepped the house well and the end product was more than expected! His price was fair compared to competitors. FHP finished the project in a timely manner . He even offered to come back and touch up the paint after we have moved in ! I would recommend FHP for any job!

Our profession is competitive but the way we go about our business is anything but normal when it comes to servicing our client’s homes. We take pride with every single exterior or interior painting project that we undertake because we understand that we only get one chance to prove ourselves to you and your neighbors concerning your house paint project so we make it count, every time.

I'm an architect and my firm routinely specifies interior finishes for projects so I thought I'd contribute a professional's perspective on the issue of how many coats of paint are deemed "acceptable". The fact of the matter is the average consumer usually isn't a paint expert and can't be expected to know about all the factors that impact coverage. That knowledge is considered "means and methods" and in a court of law, the responsibility lies with the painter or general contractor, not the consumer. What the consumer should be concerned about is the final result-does it look good and is it what you expected? The simplest way to communicate this to your painter is to stipule in your written agreement that the number of coats will be "as required to cover". That way all the guess work about what kind of primer, how many coats, how color affects the scope of work, etc., is removed from the consumer's responsibility and resides where it belongs-with the professional. In the contract that's why retention is always a good idea-typically 10% is withheld from payment until the job is completed to the satisfaction of the customer. Of course in return you as the customer have to be reasonable about what constitutes a completed job. Just my $.02.
Spills and spatters happen, regardless of how careful you are. It’s a lot easier to pre- pare for them than to wipe them out of your carpeting or off your wood floor later. All it takes is canvas drop cloths in your work area (a 4-ft. x 15-ft. cloth costs $15). The thick canvas stays in place, so you don’t need to tape it, and you can use it to cover any surface. Plastic drop cloths are slippery to walk on or set a ladder on and don’t stay in place. Even worse, paint spills on plastic stay wet, and they can end up on your shoes and get tracked through the house. Canvas is slippery on hard floors, so rosin paper ($10 for 400 sq. ft. at home centers) is better over vinyl, tile and hard- wood. Tape the sheets together and to the floor to provide a nonslip surface.
When you choose CertaPro Painters® for your exterior painting services, you can be confident that you’ll get the highest quality paint job from an experienced team of expert painters. At CertaPro Painters®, our goal is to deliver extraordinary experiences. We do the painting, so you can do life. When you’re ready to schedule your free painting estimate, contact us.
Note: Refunds will only be made after EPA verifies fee receipt and deposit by the U.S. Treasury. Firms must notify the Agency in writing in order to qualify for a refund. The date of withdrawal is the date on which the Agency received the withdrawal notification. EPA will not refund fees after granting a firm certification or re-certification. If your application is disapproved, EPA will not refund fees. Refunds are not available for replacing a certificate. Refund and withdrawal requests must be sent to the following address:
If you decide to hire help, have several contractors inspect the job and provide proposals. You'll probably find huge price differences for the same job. A Checkbook undercover shopper got quotes from nine Washington-area contractors to repaint the walls, ceiling and trim for a living room, dining room, family room, bathroom and kitchen. Including paint and supplies, prices ranged from $2,650 or less to more than $6,500.
I managed commercial construction projects for many years, have built and remodeled several properties, and never once have I encountered any of these scams. The tone of this article is deeply troubling. The author seems to be saying that ALL painting contractors are inherently dishonest, and that has not been my experience. The underlying advice here is sound: get it all in writing and cover as many contingencies as possible--so pointing out potential pitfalls like coat coverage is helpful. But do that in the spirit of clear communication of expectations, not with the expectation that the person you are hiring will try to cheat you at every turn. Not every contractor takes outrageous advantage of change orders; not every contractor will sneak past necessary preparation and/or repairs. Contractors of all sorts get a bad rap as it is; reinforcing a stereotype with articles written from this point of view just seems unproductive.
I used to work at Sherwin Williams. The best thing to do is specify that you will purchase your own paint. If the painter objects strenuously, he was plaanning on making money in the ways this article outlines. You might pay a few dollars more for paint, but you will have control of the quality of what goes on your walls. Never skimp on paint quality.
Second: all the tricks of the trade in regard to "cheating" customers is for hustlers and cheaters and NOT established businesses. At the end of the project the job should come out looking professionally painted as specified in the contract. A selected color that takes multiple coats that was not calculated by the contractor should cost more money. It's not the fault of the painter.
Contractors apply several layers of paint to achieve a suitable finish. They leave the first coat to dry for the recommended time and apply one or more finishing coats. They might choose paints with special qualities for different types of room. Manufacturers have developed paints for bathrooms or kitchens that have good resistance to moisture for example. When they have completed painting, they clear away any equipment and restore the area to its original condition.

I agree with JHs. If there is no new color on it at all, just talk to the painter about it, if it was an honest mistake (which can happen very easily while painting) your painter should have no problem fixing it. However, in my years of experience, it is not unusual for 2 coats of door paint (good quality) not to cover very well at all. I once painted a red door 7 times, plus a tinted prime coat before I found the door to be a solid color.
To win work, contractors generally have to bid against other suppliers. To make an accurate bid, they estimate the time and materials required to complete the job. They measure the area to be painted and discuss the type of finish the customer requires. They assess the quality of the surfaces to work out how much remedial work they must carry out before painting. They might have to remove old paint or wall coverings, or repair cracks and other damage. They also calculate the cost of any essential equipment, such as scaffolding for exterior walls.
Transitioning your painting business away from these mistakes can be difficult, but I guarantee you it’s worth it. You’ll look back at your business and say, ‘How did I even operate that way?’ Once you start doing things more efficiently and reaping the benefits, you’ll be UNABLE to return to your old ways of running things. Try eliminating just 2 of these mistakes and see what happens!
Second: all the tricks of the trade in regard to "cheating" customers is for hustlers and cheaters and NOT established businesses. At the end of the project the job should come out looking professionally painted as specified in the contract. A selected color that takes multiple coats that was not calculated by the contractor should cost more money. It's not the fault of the painter.
Steve, not only did you come off with an edge regarding the article written for Angie's list but you came awfully close to being slanderous. The article was written if you will have read his bio by a very well established professional painter. The issue regarding the deposit was put in question by a responder. I have read your response in full as you suggested, and companies as large as yours are just as likely to use the tricks of the trade as the small guy as you suggest, if not more so. A large company has less oversight and workers get lazy with the boss not looking over their shoulder. I have had experience in this area, and thought that i was dealing with a very reputable company that had been recommended by a couple friends, my insurance company, and my adjuster who had dealt with the company. I had terrible problems with the company, who do full restorations and like your company paint in all areas. To finalize your statement that Established businesses do not cheat customers is completly false and is a very misleading statement. I am suprised that Angies list allowed you to post such an outragious comment. All you have to do is look in the Civil lawsuits section of the Established businesses that are being sued or are under investigation for fraud and cheating their customers!
Hello, I have a sad situation to share -- a friend of mine who is a very good painter, experienced too, fell off a tall ladder that did not have "boots" on it. (I've never seen those.) Anyway, do you think he should have asked for boots before painting? Possibly it was a situation where he was shy to ask because he wanted the job... (I don't know all the details.)
×